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#dementiacarervoices Blog – Call for stories! #wmty16

Leading up to, and on the June 6th 2016, Dementia Carer Voices are asking for people to share with their stories and photos with us: What Matters To you ? Who Matters To You ?   We are doing t…

Source: Call for stories! #wmty16

Changeday? What has that got to do with me?

“What’s it got to do with me!?”

I’m pretty sure every person that reads this has heard that statement and felt the negativity hit like a freight train. Sadly when I initiate conversations about NHS Changeday I get this comment from time to time but I LOVE IT!

You see it gives me that opening to flip someone’s whole thought process and attitude on its head. Let me explain, to me these people tend to be ignorant or uneducated about what Changeday can do for them. Human nature naturally makes people feel interest when there’s something in it for them, so let’s for example imagine a Porter.

Porters are an invaluable asset and members of our services but they are not clinicians and as such tend not to get involved in some initiatives because they don’t feel they are relevant. Well here comes Changeday!

So this Porter transports patients from Ward A to Treatment area B, to do this the quickest route is straight through the centre of the hospital down the same artificially lit drab corridors which takes on average 7 minutes. After a conversation with a particular patient about this mundane journey our Porter decides he’s going to do something different (shock, horror, gasp).

One day the Porter decides to take the long way around, along different corridors that have windows facing the outside world. Whilst on this journey Mrs Patient sees a squirrel scurry across the grass, her face lights up with a joyous grin as a memory of a day trip to a country park with her late husband starts replaying in her head. Now during the remainder of the journey stories are exchanged and Mrs Patient starts to feel like a human being again.

The benefit to our Porter, well he got the satisfaction of sharing this ladies story but also a warm and more importantly sincere thank you upon arriving at their destination. The cost of this little change? Simply 2 minutes added to the journey. This one small change made a massive difference not only to Mrs Patient but to every future patient our Porter transported because he simply dared to do something different.

As a society we sometimes forget the importance of the little things and the impact they can have, so I say to these people it has everything to do with you. You can change the little things, you can dare to be different and you can do something positive. You really do have the power to make a difference and all it takes is that one positive thought.

Come on what is Change Day Maria

NHS Changeday is on its way again, here’s a recap of my take on it last year. It wi be interesting to see any differences in my thoughts and feelings so i suppose I better get a current one written!

Dare to Care by @ProudtoNurse

“Come on Maria, what exactly does NHS Change Day mean

in real terms for us?”

This was the question fired by a friend of mine the other day.

I had finally managed to complete my first ever blog and proudly read it her aloud. Needless to say my enthused tone and usual over excitement upon finishing reading it were both brought back down to Earth with the killer noise [SIGH].

‘Do you want my opinion?’ I was pretty sure I had already had it but she continued anyway, ‘Just type your ‘Change Day Chatter’; the blog might still be rubbish but they won’t forget your commitment or passion in a hurry.’ Harsh but potentially correct!

So, I hear you ask. What does NHS Change Day mean for you? Well, for me NHS Change Day is about everyone who cares about the NHS – both staff and public, that’s patients and…

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We all look the same in blue……but what if we didn’t?

Reposting due to self promise of restarting my blogging ventures!

Dare to Care by @ProudtoNurse

I am a Ward Sister for Derbyshire’s Bolsover Hospital.  After qualifying as a Nurse almost three years ago, I chose to work in a community hospital because I felt that this is where I could make the biggest difference. I knew that I wanted to connect with people and support them on a level beyond administering medication and to have the time to get to know them as an individual which can be more difficult in acute hospitals. I knew that I wanted to work with a team that were motivated and that valued each other because they were able to take pride in the work that they do. I am very fortunate that I have found this at Bolsover.

We are a community hospital. That means we are run differently to a mainstream or acute hospital and it also means that we regularly see a different kind of…

View original post 689 more words

We all look the same in blue……but what if we didn’t?

I am a Ward Sister for Derbyshire’s Bolsover Hospital.  After qualifying as a Nurse almost three years ago, I chose to work in a community hospital because I felt that this is where I could make the biggest difference. I knew that I wanted to connect with people and support them on a level beyond administering medication and to have the time to get to know them as an individual which can be more difficult in acute hospitals. I knew that I wanted to work with a team that were motivated and that valued each other because they were able to take pride in the work that they do. I am very fortunate that I have found this at Bolsover.

We are a community hospital. That means we are run differently to a mainstream or acute hospital and it also means that we regularly see a different kind of patient and care for them in a different way. We help rehabilitate people so that they are well enough to leave hospital and live life the way they want to live it. We often get people who have been in an acute hospital but who are not yet ready to go home staying with us. I’ve seen a big increase in older people, people with mental health problems and people with dementia in recent times. This is not only due to an aging population but to a growing appreciation that people sometimes need to be cared for in a different way to that offered in an acute hospital.  We are in the perfect position to help people get access to the support they need before going back home, to help assess their personal needs and provide care that allows for practices to be tailored to them for their needs to be met. It is about person centred care that does not make the patients fit into the hospitals routines; rather it makes the hospital appreciate their routines. A holistic approach to care delivery that is driven by patients and their loved ones.

For a long time now I have been wanting and asking for a tool that could help us capture important information about our patients and support them as an individual in an easy to use format.  When I found the work of Helen Sanderson Associates on the SCIE website I tweeted Helen and low and behold got a response straight back. To be honest I wasn’t expecting one but I was very happy when it happened. I’ve since learned so much more about one-page profiles, how they work, what they can achieve and the practicalities of putting them into practice in hospitals.  Helen recently made a pledge on the NHSChangeDay website to introduce one-page profiles for 1000 staff and patients in the NHS. I would LOVE to see this happen.

Can you imagine what a difference it would make? I know my excitement and my passion for patient focused  nursing can sometimes mean that I am running ideas through at 100 miles an hour but I have stopped and thought in detail about how this could actually work and it is a win win for everyone. Patients coming onto the ward could have one-page profiles that help us identify what is important to them and therefore how best to support them in this. How can we nurse someone back to health if we don’t know what ‘being healthy’ looks like for them? Are they a dog walker, an avid cook or gardener? How much time would we save from sifting through information, trying to determine the support needs of a patient, if all we would have to do is look at a single sheet of paper? Think about how we could respond during a handover when the staff nurse tells us that Mary in bed 3b is ‘out of sorts’. We would actually know what it meant for Mary to be ‘in sorts’ and therefore what we should be doing to support her today.

In turn I would love to see staff have one-page profiles so that we could understand each other better but also so we could introduce ourselves properly to patients. Imagine if patients were able to learn a little bit more about the person caring for them. How much more connected would they feel? What could it do for their health and wellbeing? When I think about the barriers it would break down and how it could help improve communication and relationships, I know that this is something that I want to see happen.

“They all look the same in blue” this is something I hear regularly from patients and visitors throughout healthcare and this is what I want to change. I want us to be people, treating and caring for people. This is what I believe being patient-centred is. And this is what one-page profiles can help us to achieve.

You can read my one-page profile here and watch the video of how Helen and I it create here.

Onepp
One Page Profile