We all look the same in blue……but what if we didn’t?

I am a Ward Sister for Derbyshire’s Bolsover Hospital.  After qualifying as a Nurse almost three years ago, I chose to work in a community hospital because I felt that this is where I could make the biggest difference. I knew that I wanted to connect with people and support them on a level beyond administering medication and to have the time to get to know them as an individual which can be more difficult in acute hospitals. I knew that I wanted to work with a team that were motivated and that valued each other because they were able to take pride in the work that they do. I am very fortunate that I have found this at Bolsover.

We are a community hospital. That means we are run differently to a mainstream or acute hospital and it also means that we regularly see a different kind of patient and care for them in a different way. We help rehabilitate people so that they are well enough to leave hospital and live life the way they want to live it. We often get people who have been in an acute hospital but who are not yet ready to go home staying with us. I’ve seen a big increase in older people, people with mental health problems and people with dementia in recent times. This is not only due to an aging population but to a growing appreciation that people sometimes need to be cared for in a different way to that offered in an acute hospital.  We are in the perfect position to help people get access to the support they need before going back home, to help assess their personal needs and provide care that allows for practices to be tailored to them for their needs to be met. It is about person centred care that does not make the patients fit into the hospitals routines; rather it makes the hospital appreciate their routines. A holistic approach to care delivery that is driven by patients and their loved ones.

For a long time now I have been wanting and asking for a tool that could help us capture important information about our patients and support them as an individual in an easy to use format.  When I found the work of Helen Sanderson Associates on the SCIE website I tweeted Helen and low and behold got a response straight back. To be honest I wasn’t expecting one but I was very happy when it happened. I’ve since learned so much more about one-page profiles, how they work, what they can achieve and the practicalities of putting them into practice in hospitals.  Helen recently made a pledge on the NHSChangeDay website to introduce one-page profiles for 1000 staff and patients in the NHS. I would LOVE to see this happen.

Can you imagine what a difference it would make? I know my excitement and my passion for patient focused  nursing can sometimes mean that I am running ideas through at 100 miles an hour but I have stopped and thought in detail about how this could actually work and it is a win win for everyone. Patients coming onto the ward could have one-page profiles that help us identify what is important to them and therefore how best to support them in this. How can we nurse someone back to health if we don’t know what ‘being healthy’ looks like for them? Are they a dog walker, an avid cook or gardener? How much time would we save from sifting through information, trying to determine the support needs of a patient, if all we would have to do is look at a single sheet of paper? Think about how we could respond during a handover when the staff nurse tells us that Mary in bed 3b is ‘out of sorts’. We would actually know what it meant for Mary to be ‘in sorts’ and therefore what we should be doing to support her today.

In turn I would love to see staff have one-page profiles so that we could understand each other better but also so we could introduce ourselves properly to patients. Imagine if patients were able to learn a little bit more about the person caring for them. How much more connected would they feel? What could it do for their health and wellbeing? When I think about the barriers it would break down and how it could help improve communication and relationships, I know that this is something that I want to see happen.

“They all look the same in blue” this is something I hear regularly from patients and visitors throughout healthcare and this is what I want to change. I want us to be people, treating and caring for people. This is what I believe being patient-centred is. And this is what one-page profiles can help us to achieve.

You can read my one-page profile here and watch the video of how Helen and I it create here.

Onepp
One Page Profile

They all look the same in blue! What if we didn’t?

Exactly, if you can read this and then still tell me you are not interested then there is something wrong somehow with the majority of folk you meet in communitys

Personalisation in Health Services

 Written by Maria Davison, Ward Sister

Maria OPPI am a Ward Sister for Derbyshire’s Bolsover Hospital.  After qualifying as a Nurse almost three years ago, I chose to work in a community hospital because I felt that this is where I could make the biggest difference. I knew that I wanted to connect with people and support them on a level beyond administering medication and to have the time to get to know them as an individual which can be more difficult in acute hospitals. I knew that I wanted to work with a team that were motivated and that valued each other because they were able to take pride in the work that they do. I am very fortunate that I have found this at Bolsover.

We are a community hospital. That means we are run differently to a mainstream or acute hospital and it also means that we…

View original post 692 more words

Come on what is Change Day Maria

“Come on Maria, what exactly does NHS Change Day mean

in real terms for us?”

This was the question fired by a friend of mine the other day.

I had finally managed to complete my first ever blog and proudly read it her aloud. Needless to say my enthused tone and usual over excitement upon finishing reading it were both brought back down to Earth with the killer noise [SIGH].

‘Do you want my opinion?’ I was pretty sure I had already had it but she continued anyway, ‘Just type your ‘Change Day Chatter’; the blog might still be rubbish but they won’t forget your commitment or passion in a hurry.’ Harsh but potentially correct!

So, I hear you ask. What does NHS Change Day mean for you? Well, for me NHS Change Day is about everyone who cares about the NHS – both staff and public, that’s patients and visitors, inclusive of everybody, thus meaning NHS Change Day, for me; is about you and your loved ones. It’s a ‘call to action’ encouraging people to pledge to do something differently so as to enhance patients, visitors and staff members experiences a positive effect on their journey through healthcare.

My favorite analogy of how I see NHS Change Day is the knock on effect of people having the courage to ‘Rock the Boat’, a wave of change caused by a single ripple in still water.

E.g. A dance school could pledge to promote healthily eating and inspire others to do the same. This pledge, this single ripple could splash somebody who it inspires to rock their own boat (so to speak); make their own ripples and eat healthily also. This could be the difference in this person developing diabetes for example. Then again this ever growing ripple would splash others as the story is shared. Before you know it a decision to ‘rock the boat/challenge status quo has made a tiny ripple into a huge wave, all through people rocking their boats together; team work!

 

NHS Change Day celebrates inclusion of all not the seclusion of any. It is handing back the reins to our National Treasure, our NHS; and we can all be involved. For example, the local youth club’s pledge to do shopping trips for the older generation through the bad weather may be seen as ‘not appropriate, not NHS, not relevant’; these views couldn’t be more wrong. Let me tell you a story of ‘what ifs’, just imagine…..

Imagine…..     

– this pledge from the youth club ultimately may lead to Edith not risking the snow this  winters evening, therefore; Edith would not be at risk of falling on the ice walking down the short lane to the local shop.

– This means Edith won’t need to lay freezing in the snow, in pain, unable to move, until somebody comes by.

Now imagine the upset that wasn’t caused because Edith wouldn’t need to go into hospital so she wouldn’t have to miss going to bingo club.

– Edith would not become isolated through being scared to go out again, just in case.

– She wouldn’t even start to sleep in the chair as she didn’t tell the nursing team the fib of having no pain; just to get home to her beloved cat, Oscar.

– In fact, Edith would still be Edith and still be living as she chooses to do.

                          Oh yes and what happened to the others linked to this story?

– Well the man who found Edith hurt in the snow freezing cold, he wouldn’t have had time off work or needed his partners support that night. He wouldn’t have gone through his struggle to accept it was not his fault that he didn’t go out earlier like planned.

– The ambulance that came to Edith that day they may not have been ‘just a minute too late    for that other person’.

– The hospital admin team have needed to sort the notes of the little boy sat crying with his mummy whose turn it now was to see the doctors,

– and mummy could have stopped feeling sick with worry and wouldn’t have forgotten to take her insulin.

– The porter? He had the time to help the lady living with dementia to safely find the right area in the hospital,

– and the nurse? She was able to support the daughter of the palliative lady whom had just took her last breath,

– and this daughter? Well she had luckily just arrived in time to be with her mum at the end.

But imagine…..

– That was only because her husband wasn’t upset as he had not witnessed a lady laid in the snow freezing cold and obviously hurt……

Now looking again at that youth club, we salute you. To one and all ‘Anchors Up’. Welcome on board, now let us fly the flag for #NHSchangeday whilst we sail the rough waters together to reach the golden sands of ‘Change Island.’  SHIP AHOY!!

Maria Davison

NHS Lead Change Day East Midlands

07443 568145

@ProudToNurse

I am the ward sister of Linden Ward,

Bolsover Hospital, Derbyshire Community HPiccyealth Services. This is the first blog venture I have completed yet am very interested in furthering this blogging skill, or lack of! I am passionate and proud of my compassionate care with inclusion for all not the seclusion of any.